Florence is the much celebrated capital of Tuscany that boasts of a rich artistic heritage and is widely known as the cradle of Renaissance. While this gorgeous city is loved for its small-town charm, its international flair is the magnet that attracts tourists from every nook and corner of the world.

The Tuscan paradise is also known as an open-air museum because every place, every building, and every square has a story to tell. With unrivalled magnum opuses such as aesthetic paintings, anatomically realistic sculptures and unparalleled architecture, Florence is brimming with numerous galleries that shelter incomparable genius works of arts. Here we provide you with a peek into the melting pot of exquisite artworks in the Accademia.

A visit to the Renaissance Paradise

‘Accademia dell’Arte del Disegno’ aka ‘Gallery of the Academy’ has been a heaven for art lovers as well as tourists since 1784. The world-famous Accademia protects the ethereal chef-d’oeuvres that set the benchmark for mankind’s artistic ingenuity, including the original 17 feet tall statue of David carved out of gleaming marble by none other than Michelangelo. Some additional pieces by Michelangelo you cannot miss are the semi-sculpted statues of slaves that adorn the capacious entrance hallway. Moreover, the acclaimed masterworks by established Renaissance artists like Botticelli, Domenico, and Alessandro Allori will unarguably take your breath away.

Immerse yourself in the sound of the ancient music

If you are a great fan of the traditional musical instruments then the Accademia has a special treat in store for you. The ostentatious ‘Musical Instrument Museum’ has the most splendid panoply of forty musical instruments, from the 16th century Grand Ducal Collection! Nothing can be compared to the opulence of this section as you marvel at the elegance of the string and wind instruments. What makes the experience even more immersive is the opportunity to hear the music of these instruments whilst learning their history.

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